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Holding Your Baby

PICKING UP A NEWBORN

To calm and reassure your baby, as well as yourself, make eye contact and talk soothingly to her before you pick her up. If you snatch your baby suddenly, you will startle her. Slide one hand underneath her to support her lower back and bottom. From the opposite side, slide your other hand under to support her neck and head. Take the weight of her head and body, and gently lift her into a cradling position.

THE NEED FOR YOUR SUPPORT

Until your baby is at least eight weeks old, she cannot control her head or muscles, so you must take the weight of her head and body.

PUTTING YOUR – BABY DOWN SAFELY

Put your baby down just as you would pick her up: that is, with your whole arm supporting her spine, neck, and head. Once the pad is taking her weight, slide your nearest hand from under her bottom. Use this hand to help lift her head so you can slide out the hand still supporting her head, and lower it down gently onto the pad.

A PROTECT THE HEAD FROM FLOPPING

From a cradling position make sure you have one hand, palm open, taking the weight of your baby’s head.

CRADLING A BABY THE NATURAL WAY

From the picking-up position, Your wrist and hand encircle her carefully transfer your baby’s head back while your other arm lends to the crook of your slightly extra support to her bottom and inclined arm (whichever you are legs. Cradling this way means your comfortable with) or your shoulder. baby can look and listen to you.

SHOULDER HUGGING

When your baby can support her head, she will enjoy the close contact of this hold, where her head nestles by your head. Her arms cling onto your clothes or by your neck. You wrap both of your arms across her legs and bottom.

SOOTHING HOLD

This is a good calming hold after boisterous play; it is also good for burping your baby.

HOLD FROM THE HIP

After your baby has learned to hold her head up, she can cling onto you while sitting astride your hip. This is a great hold when you are moving around getting her feeding or clothes ready. She feels close and safe, and also has a good view.

SELF-SUPPORTING

Your baby’s knees grip your hips while your arm supports her back and bottom. This also gives you the use of a free hand.

GIVING GENTLE SWINGS & BOUNCES

Once your baby can lift his head and has muscle control, at around four months, you can introduce some gentle physical play, such as holding him above your head, perching him high on your shoulder, or bouncing him on your knee. Avoid shaking and rough play, which can cause serious injury. Be responsive to his mood.

USING BABY JUMPERS & BABY WALKERS

Baby jumpers are useful for supervised play. They give baby sensations of movement while giving your arms a much-needed rest. Baby walkers should not be used unsupervised; they have been the cause of injuries Once a baby can crawl, use any mobility aid only for brief periods: he needs to explore freely!

USING A FRONT PACK

For the first three months, a front pack is an excellent way of carrying your baby around both indoors and outside. The close contact to your body and the motion as you walk soothes her, and it leaves your arms free.

 

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